Jaidev S

Jaidev S

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About me:

I am part of the Travellr development team. I hope you like what we have created!

Joined:

February 2009

  • +2 rating

    Is USD $100/day unreasonable for backpacking in Japan?

    It depends on what you are trying to do, but I managed on about that comfortably. If you have sorted out things like a rail pass and such before hand then should be fine. Backpackers I stayed in were like $30 US for a bed in a dorm room, and generally I was paying < $10 a meal. More interesting food can often cost more of course. Most of the things I went to see didn't cost much to get into, biggest costs that aside really were transport. over 7 years ago

  • +2 rating

    Japan - suggested itinerary and can I do it on my own?

    Itinerary wise, I think you might be trying to get too much done in too little time - spending a bit more time at certain destinations like Simon suggested is probably a good idea. While traveling around I found that the Japanese really do want to help you, but the english literacy there is very very low. Along with some basic japanese, it is very useful to learn Katakana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katakana). Katakana is what is used when words have been adopted from english. It might look daunting at first but there are only 50ish characters you need to know, and they translate easily into english syllables. The reason katakana is useful is that a lot of signs you will encounter are just plain english words written in katakana, for example: Toilet in english becomes 'toire', or トイレ. Breaking the word up into its syllables ト = to, イ = i, レ = re. Basically this means in a lot of cases you can just read the katakana on a lot of signs to get an idea what it says, another example is: bus = basu = バス By the way, I am not saying that all japanese signs have an english version of the words in katakana on them, simply that the japanese use a lot of english words for a lot of basic things. As for "lonely and difficult", while I was there I stayed at some really awesome hostels (mostly, k's houses http://kshouse.jp), and met some really awesome people whom I traveled around with - Hostels might not be for you, but it helps to stay somewhere where they can help you out with working out how to get around / catch trains or anything else like that. If you are only there for 10-12 days, a lot of the stuff you will do will be more on the beaten track, and thus a bit more non-english-speaking traveller friendly. Japan has plenty of amazing things that are commonly traveled (the Japanese *love* to travel around Japan and see everything there is to see). One final tip is to look up english versions of the subway / train maps before you go and print them out. My english Tokyo subway map was a great help! almost 8 years ago

  • +2 rating

    What are THE things to see in Perth?

    For Perth, the city itself really isn't *that* amazing, maybe you should spend a day poking around just to say you have been there but that is about it. Must dos are catching the train down to Freemantle (if you can between thursday - sunday as the markets are open then and things in general are a little busier) - There is plenty to do and see there, lots of interesting shops, some good nightlife, and perhaps most importantly the Little Creatures brewery :). I also think visiting Perth without spending a day at one of its beaches is a crime, so check them out - one of my favouites is Cottesloe, and it is easy to get to as well (on the same train line as Freemantle, about 20 mins out of Perth). Rottnest is actually pretty nice, and fits in well with a lot of Perth's attractions (being more about relaxing and having fun than anything else). There is an awesome sunset from there, and the island really is beautiful - a good way to see it is just to cycle around it. One of the bad things about WA is that everything is so spaced out, so if you actually do want to get out of Perth on a 5 day schedule you are kind of out of luck, although if you can find the time I recommend heading south to Margaret River (3ish hours drive south) - a very relaxing place full of good wineries :). almost 9 years ago