Ask Phil

Ask Phil

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  • 0 rating

    Do I need a visa to travel to Italy with my family?

    Your permanent residency means nothing when entering a 3rd country, to them you are a Thai citizen. You will need to apply for a Schengen Area tourist visa (Italy is in the Schengen area of Europe) via the Italian consulate in your city. Make sure you can re-enter Australia too, check out this page: http://www.immi.gov.au/FAQs/Pages/i-am-a-permanent-resident-what-documents-do-i-need-to-come-back-into-australia.aspx I'm assuming your child has an Aussie passport - otherwise you'll need a visa for them too. Don't forget to get travel insurance too. www.worldnomads.com 14 days ago

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    As an American, how much time should I allow for a working/holiday visa to be approved for Australia?

    processing time is 6 days (I imagine that's working days so don't count saturday and Sunday). https://www.immi.gov.au/about/charters/client-services-charter/visas/1.0.htm 14 days ago

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    As an Australian is it best to apply for a Working Holiday Visa for Germany in Australia before I leave or in Germany when I arrive?

    According to the german embassy website: Australian citizens (as well as New Zealand and Japanese citizens) are encouraged to apply for a residence permit after entering Germany at the local immigration authority ('Ausländerbehörde'), without prior applying for a visa in Australia. Check out more here: http://www.australien.diplo.de/Vertretung/australien/en/Visa/Working-Holiday.html 14 days ago

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    I am backpacking thailand in september.would world nomads cover me if i had to cancel my trip if the current political situation worsens?

    Jazzmanblues, We’re delighted to have you as a Nomad and contribute to this forum and the travel community. You’re a valued member. But I thought I’d add some balance to the discussion by putting our side to your comments here. That’s correct things like war, terrorism and coups are General Exclusions. Without getting too "insurance-ey" let's just say there are some things that if they happened would leave the insurers open to (literally) incalculable costs and could send all the insurers in the world broke. There are two options to prevent that: charge an astronomically higher price for a policy, or exclude the event from the policy and keep the cost low - and still cover 99% of things that might happen to a traveller. That’s the brutal reality of doing business. As to medical expenses - true, basic medical stuff is pretty cheap and probably below the “excess” (deductible) you’d pay on a claim, but to be frank, when you’re really hurt is when travel insurance pays off. Even in Thailand intensive care/trauma treatment can cost thousands of dollars a day. If you need medical evacuation back to your home country it can cost at least $50,000 and probably more like $100,000. Lots of people travel with laptops and other digital equipment, all of which is covered if your luggage is lost or stolen - that’s money to go travel rather than replacing equipment. 90% of Nomads have a trouble-free trip, and we’re trying to make that a larger number by giving safety tips etc. The problem is, there’s no way of telling if you’re going to be in the 90% or the 10%. Does that make coverage ‘expensive” or unnecessary? That’s up to the individual, the level of risk they’re willing to accept and the value they place on that peace of mind. It looks like you’ve made up your mind on it - and that’s great if you’re comfortable with that. As I said at the beginning, we’re delighted to have you as a Nomad and contributor to the travel community. Others may feel differently. Cheers Jazzmanblues. Keep on travelling. about 1 month ago

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    I am backpacking thailand in september.would world nomads cover me if i had to cancel my trip if the current political situation worsens?

    dankeshoen, it depends on what type of travel insurance you have, from what company, and which policy and options you chose, but GENERALLY if you don't want to go to Thailand anymore that's not "cancellation" that's "change of mind" and is not covered. You can get that type of cover in some places, such as US, but World Nomads policies do not have it. Cancellation in our policies means if parts of your trip - flights, hotels, pre-paid tours etc - are cancelled on you, i.e. because of unforeseen circumstances the operator is unable to provide that service anymore. If that operator didn't give you a full refund, you'd be eligible to make a claim for the difference. But can I add, I don't feel there's any need to cancel your trip given the current situation. The Thai junta is making it clear tourists are still welcome, and has lifted the curfew in lots of places popular with tourists (check out the list here: http://safety.worldnomads.com/thailand). But of course the decision abut what level of risk you're prepared to accept is up to you. about 1 month ago

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    Sim card for 3g ---italy and greece

    ITALY The process of getting a pre-paid SIM card in Italy is so Italian! For a mobile phone-mad country it’s odd that you will find it hard to locate a phone shop at the airport. In contrast, just about every town with a handful of residents has at least one! Here’s the peculiarly Italian part, you’ll need your passport and a codice fiscale – a unique code that equates to an Italian tax file number - to purchase a prepaid plan. You can apply for one from the Embassy here in Australia before you leave, or most stores will set one up for you on the spot. There are 4 primary providers (and quite a few re-sellers): TIM (Telecom Italia Mobile) Vodafone, Wind and 3 (or Tre). What to ask for A prepaid plan is called a ricaricabile. Stores in a tourist area are likely to have an English-speaking assistant, but if not (or you want to try your hand at Italian) ask for “una scheda ricaricabile, anche per navigare in Internet sul mio smartphone” (“a pay-as-you-go SIM that also connects to the Internet via my smartphone”). You’ll need to purchase a data pack. TIM has one for about €2 a week for 250MB, the others have similar deals. Recharges (ricariche) can be done at grocery stores, tobacconists, bars, magazine shops, ATMs, your provider's Internet website or customer service lines. Ask them to activate the card and the packs for you because the prompts are in Italian. GREECE Wind, Vodafone, and Cosmote are the three 3G mobile carriers in Greece. No matter which one you choose, remember to bring your passport for purchase. They all 3 charge €5 for a SIM card. about 1 month ago

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    I need a phone in China. Can I buy "pay as you go sims" so that I do not have to use my phone on roaming.

    There are three mobile carriers in China - China Unicom, China Mobile, and China Telecom. They don't offer pre-paid packages, but have no-contract plans that are available on a monthly basis. To purchase a plan, you will need your passport. Unicom is the official iPhone retailer and the only 3G provider compatible with iPhones from other parts of the world. Plans begin at 46RMB (approximately $7) for 150mb of data and 50 minutes of local calling time. For 66RMB ($10), you get 300mb of data, 50 minutes of local calling time and 240 text messages. Don't bother with the street vendors, they're known to clone SIMs which are unusable. Go directly to an official China Unicom store. You're more likely to find an English-speaking assistant to help you connect too. Unicom stores are everywhere, ask the staff at your hotel to point you in the direction of the nearest one. Airport stands are also an option, although they are more expensive. There is a China Unicom store on the second floor on the east side of Terminal 3 at Beijing airport, next to the McDonald's. about 1 month ago

  • +1 rating

    What is the current safety situation in Sri Lanka?

    Crimes against foreigners while still uncommon, even rare, are certainly on the rise in Sri Lanka - partly because there's been a surge in visitor numbers (arrivals doubled in 2012), so there are more people for things to happen to. There could be a number of reasons, opportunity is certainly one of them. Local authorities are claiming a lack of policing (as you'll see in tis article: http://www.sundaytimes.lk/120122/News/nws_12.html) and hinting at a clash of cultures and attitudinal differences. A lot of what happens is called colloquially "eve teasing" (see this article for an explanation: http://safety.worldnomads.com/India/74219/Womens-travel-in-India-Its-a-mans-world). And remember the place was consumed in the turmoil of a civil war just a few years ago - the rules are not quite back to normal. While it is every woman's inalienable right to go about her business unmolested, that's not the practical reality, and you should take that into consideration. That's not to say the place is dangerous everywhere, all the time - but be wary of potentially dangerous situations. It's best not to walk around alone, or be on a beach alone. Sad, but true. about 1 month ago